FANDOM


The "Missing Nine" is a houserule issue that I took to D&D was in essence to try and remove the nine points of "missing" accuracy that characters had.

Effect Edit

Physical Damage Edit

Damage from any source that does not specify a damage type and comes from a non-effect source is deemed "physical damage." Some common sense may apply for certain magical effects.

Enhancement Bonus Edit

The "Enhancement bonus" from magical items has been altered as follows:

  1. Weapons: Enhancement no longer provides a bonus to any attack rolls
  2. Implements: Enhancement no longer provides a bonus to any attack rolls
  3. Armour: Enhancement no longer provides a bonus to AC. Instead, it provides a flat reduction to all physical damage IN ADDITION to any other resistance the character has.
  4. Cloak: Enhancement no longer provides a bonus to NADS.

Edit

Expertise Feats Edit

Any feat with the word "Expertise" in it that provides a scaling bonus to any D20 or defense is no longer usable.

Justification Edit

The "Missing Nine" issue that I took to D&D was in essence to try and remove the nine points of "missing" accuracy that characters had.

To make D&D monster creation simpler, almost all DCs, including defenses and attack rolls were made linearly dependent on the target level. The formulas were some variation of "X + level." This meant that a character of level 1 had an "X+1" bonus to attack, while a level 30 character had an "X+30" bonus. A rough breakdown is as follows:

  • +15 from half level (The largest portion of accuracy bonus)
  • +4 from scaling attributes (note that it is assumed this scaling takes the attribute from 18 to 26)
  • +1 from paragon path (This is often circumstantial +2s, averaged out)
  • +1 from epic destiny (often in the form of +2 to one attribute)

The result was +21. The remainder came from enhancement bonuses and expertise bonuses. Enhancement Bonuses, I felt, forced players to pursue magical equipment that most of my worlds don't have in surplus. The result was either a constant deficiency, zealous pursuit of ANY items, or a magic item economy which I didn't feel plausible for my settings. Expertise bonuses were removed because of their power. Their sheer ubiquity meant that characters were being "taxed" a feat in order to even participate. Removing it affected all characters equally, and thus made low-level characters more unique and customize able.